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THEUNITEDSTATES - democracies FIRST: textbookignores 17th...

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Why is it so different from other liberal democracies?
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FIRST: Some important things our textbook ignores
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Origins of the United States 17 th and 18 th Centuries— Colonization by the British Britain establishes settlements here, and settlers come, because of a host of motivations: ‐‐ material resources (cash crops for British production) ‐‐ Land speculation ‐‐ Land to establish farms ‐‐ Escape from poverty (people could become “indentured servants”, with promise of freedom and property after several years of servitude) ‐‐ Religious freedom
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Colonialism Britain esablishes 13 separate colonies --each has a British governor --but each is allowed significant autonomy on local affairs, with its own legislature. --ultimately, though, the British governors could impose Britain’s will and could veto acts by the state legislatures.
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Independence 1760s and 70s— Colonists (especially commercial interests) upset with England over taxation, trade restrictions, inhibition of westward expansion 1776 – Declaration of Independence 1776 1783 – Revolutionary War The colonies win independence and become 13 separate states (“state” being a synonym for “country”) They do agree to a central government to perform certain functions, but they are separate, sovereign entities—as in today’s European Union.
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A NEW COUNTRY Thus, the real birth of the U.S. is not July 4, 1776; it