Lecture 6_Viruses_2

Lecture 6_Viruses_2 - Defining a Computer Virus A virus is...

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COMP 6370 – Lecture 6 – Malicious Software 2 1 Defining a Computer Virus A virus is an entity that uses the resources of the host to spread and reproduce itself, usually without informed operator action. A virus cannot execute on its own. Strong viruses use normal computer operations to achieve the virus design goals. There is no single characteristic that can be used to identify a previously unknown virus program. Consequently, there is some academic disagreement as to just how many viruses have been released, what variants define different strains.
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COMP 6370 – Lecture 6 – Malicious Software 2 2 Virus Structure Infection : The infection mechanism may be defined as the way or ways in which the virus spreads. Payload : The payload mechanism is defined as what (if anything) the virus does in addition to replicating. Trigger : The trigger mechanism is defined as the routine that decides what time to deliver the payload if there is a payload.
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COMP 6370 – Lecture 6 – Malicious Software 2 3 Virus Damage Deliberate damage inflicted by the virus payload mechanism, if it exists, such as the trashing or intentional corruption of files. Accidental damage caused when the virus attempts to install itself on the victim system (the newly infected host), such as corruption of system areas preventing the victim system from booting. Incidental damage that may not be obvious but is nevertheless inherent in the fact of infection. Nearly all viruses entail damage in this category, since their presence involves loss of performance due to theft of memory, disk space, clock cycles, system modifications or combination of these,
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– Lecture 6 – Malicious Software 2 4 Some Social Impacts Scapegoating of virus victims Secondary damage to systems caused by inappropriate responses to a perceived virus threat (ex. low-level formatting of a hard disk to eradicate a macro virus.) Legal or quasi-legal issues such as failure to comply with data-protection legislation and policies. Inappropriate security responses
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This note was uploaded on 11/14/2011 for the course COMP 6370 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Auburn University.

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Lecture 6_Viruses_2 - Defining a Computer Virus A virus is...

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