lecture_02_ho

lecture_02_ho - BIOS 735: Statistical Computing Michael Wu...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
BIOS 735: Statistical Computing Michael Wu Lecture 2: Scalars, Vectors, Arrays, Matrices and Lists August 25, 2011 Michael Wu (Lecture 2) BIOS 735 August 25, 2011 1 / 25
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
R: What and why? Scripted language for statistical data manipulation and analysis. Follow up to S Awesomeness: I Free, public domain implementation. I Standard among professional statisticians in academia – becoming more and more popular in industry, too. I Better than many commercial products. I Multiple operating systems. I Beyond stats, it works like programming language allows automation and new function creation I Object oriented and functional programming structure I Data sets can be saved between sessions – don’t have to reload. I Open source: easy to get help and lots of new functions and resources. Annoyances: text based command submission. Michael Wu (Lecture 2) BIOS 735 August 25, 2011 2 / 25
Background image of page 2
Object Orientation/Functional Programming computer science concepts, but generally useful Example: Running linear regression SAS and SPSS produce tons of output vs. lm() produces an object containing everything (allowing you to pick and choose what you want) Polymorphism: generic functions can be applied to different types of objects Example 1: print a = "cow" b = 1 class(a); class(b) print(a); print(b) Example 2: plot a = c(1,4,-1,5,0, 8) x = rnorm(20) y = 2 * x+rnorm(1) plot(lm(y˜x)) Fewer commands since plot works on everything Michael Wu (Lecture 2) BIOS 735 August 25, 2011 3 / 25
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Functions (Example) Michael Wu (Lecture 2) BIOS 735 August 25, 2011 4 / 25
Background image of page 4
Scalars and Vectors No such thing as a Scalar in R. All objects are one-element vectors. Vectors are arrays of elements that all have the same “mode”: integers, numerics, characters, logicals, complex, object, etc. Example is.vector(1) foo = c(1,-1,12) is.vector(foo) bar = c("a", "duck", "fat") baz = c( 1+1i, 1-1i, 4+3i, 5+1i) class(foo); class(bar); class(baz) foobar = c(foo, bar); foobaz = c(foo, baz); barbaz = c(bar, baz) class(foobar); class(foobaz); class(barbaz) Michael Wu (Lecture 2) BIOS 735 August 25, 2011 5 / 25
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Vectors: Declaration and Generation Need to declare you intend variable to be a vector type: y[1] = 12 fails, but: y = vector(length=10) y[1] = 5 y[10] = 99 y[11] = 12 y = vector(length=10); y[1] = "cow" y[11] = "duck" y[12] = 99 length(y) Generating vectors: a = 1:10 b = -2:4 c = seq(10) d = seq(1,2, by = 0.1) e = seq(1,4, length = 22) f = seq(1, 9, by = pi) g = rep(42,10) h = rep(1:5, times = 3) i = rep(1:5, each = 3) j = 1:5 * 2 Michael Wu (Lecture 2) BIOS 735 August 25, 2011 6 / 25
Background image of page 6
Vectors: Arithmetic and Logical Operations Vector addition/multiplication (component-wise): x = c(1,2,3) y = c(12,14,9) x+y x * y Logical operations a = 5 a>0; a>5; a>=5; a<0; a ==0;
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 25

lecture_02_ho - BIOS 735: Statistical Computing Michael Wu...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online