Chapter_7_-_Memory

Chapter_7_-_Memory - Chapter 7: Memory We have three memory...

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Chapter 7: Memory We have three memory stores differing in: - Duration: how long a memory can last - Span: how many pieces of information we can actually retain The Memory Stores - Sensory Memory Short-Term Memory  Long-Term Memory o Sensory: Very short memory store arising from the temporary activation of perceptual areas of the brain Iconic memory: (visual) George Sperling (UCI): beginning of cognitive psychology Partial report method: testing people for part of full letters Queued recall test, they didn’t know which part they’d be asked to remember This method let them learn the full At least 12 items of information we can retain the best; lasts less than a second, a quick visual exposure Vs. photographic memory: combines very good short-term memory and iconic memory Echoic memory: (auditory) Lasts 2-3 seconds, seen in all types of sounds Very automatic If you’re not paying attention, but still remember something you hear, remembered because its still in your system ‘cocktail party effect’ Opening your ears for something which you’re looking for/wanting to recognize o Short-term: using effort to paying attention to memory Some linguistic basis (thinking, speaking, sentence-making)
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This note was uploaded on 11/18/2011 for the course PSYC 100 taught by Professor Madigan during the Spring '07 term at USC.

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Chapter_7_-_Memory - Chapter 7: Memory We have three memory...

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