Lesson 23 - Lesson 23: Potpourri of Gemstones Learning...

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Lesson 23: Potpourri of Gemstones Learning Objectives By the end of this Lesson on potpourri of gems, learners will: Describe the difference between nephrite and jadeite Identify and describe the diversity of gems in the quartz family Describe the important features of precious chrysoberyl Describe fine quality gem zoisite and olivine Describe the colour range and diagnostic shapes of the garnet group Identify the three most common organic gems and comment on their historical and current environmental impacts Introduction In this section, we'll cover the remainder of the precious stones, some precious gems, and a few organic gems, but in much less detail than before. This overview will familiarize you with the rest of the popular stones you'll see in jewellery stores and in rock shops (or maybe even in your own collection!). Primary readings come from your textbook. We'll also take a look at some of the current developments in the pearl and coral industries. As you've already found out, the text is well written and a pleasure to read - enjoy! Essential Readings from your Textbook Topic: Cab'd and Carved Pages Lapis Lazuli 243, 244 - 245 Jade 274 - 275, 279 - 281 Turquoise 196 - 197 Topic: Others Pages Quartz Group 219 - 233 Chrysoberyl 159 Zoisite 296
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Garnet 300 - 303 Olivine 298 - 299 Topic: Organic Gems Pages Pearl 322 - 325 Amber 314 - 315 Coral 320 Readings Outside the Textbook Shor, R. (2007). " From Single Source to Global Free Market: The Transformation of the Cultured Pearl Industry ". , Vol 43, No. 3, p200-226. Use the Shor-2007 Reading Guide to help you with the article. Cabochon and Carved Gems Many of the gemstones that are fashioned into cabochons or carved do not readily form transparent crystals appropriate for faceting. However, they typically show vibrant colours or interesting textures that have been valued both in antiquity (e.g., lapis lazuli) and today (e.g., jade). Lapis Lazuli Text Content: pp 244 - 245 Sodalite Text Content: p 243 Lapis lazuli is actually not a single mineral, but rather a mixture comprising mostly of lazurite, pyrite, and calcite with minor diopside, sodalite and haüyne. It has a long history dating back to the Egyptian and Babylonian civilizations and in historical Europe was often
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called "ultramarine". Today, most lapis lazuli is produced from Sar-e-Sang, Afghanistan, with minor production in the Lake Baikal region of Russia and the Andes in Chile near Coquimbo. Canada hosts one known lapis lazuli deposit, and it is located in the far north of Baffin Island. The USA has two main localities: one at Italian Mountain in Colorado and the other near Balmat, New York. This carving of lapis lazuli from Afghanistan shows the deep colour from that locality. Photo courtesy of Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History. Jade: Jadeite and Nephrite
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This note was uploaded on 11/18/2011 for the course EOSC 118 taught by Professor Daveturner during the Spring '10 term at The University of British Columbia.

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Lesson 23 - Lesson 23: Potpourri of Gemstones Learning...

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