Emotions - a active copers b no feedback 5 What killed the...

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Emotions I. Conceptual issues A. Defining emotions 1 Elements of feelings, physiology, evaluation, and action. 2. Notions of approach and avoidance. B. Theory meets neuroscience 1 Components of emotions: subjective vs physiological 2 Three theories a. James-Lange b. Cannon-Bard c. Lazarus-Folkman 3 LeDoux’s Low and High roads to emotional responding. II. Applications A. The study of psychological stress 1. Stress as a type of emotion: an interruption of psychological homeostasis. 2 Psychological homeostasis: Short term and long term. Examples of interruptions of each. B. One more story about interactionism. 1. The Sidman avoidance task 2. Training and schedules 3. Call in CSI: Death by stomach ulcer 4. Solving the case of the serendipitous findings.
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Unformatted text preview: a. active copers b. no feedback 5 What killed the monkey C. Lie detection 1. The context. a. Individuals have something to gain or loose b. They wish to be judged truthful or honest c. Some individuals must deceive the examiner in order to be seen as honest, avoid punishment, or obtain a reward. 2. Psychophysiological challenge: Identify physiological changes or patterns associated with lying. 3. The polygrapher’s tools. a. Polygraph 1. The instrument—amplifying biological signals 2. Some responses 3. The primacy of electrodermal measures. 2. Obtaining baseline and other pre-testing measures. 4. Techniques CT and GKT Control questions and the guilty knowledge test. Watch these closely....
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