Lecture+15 - Lecture 15 Beans Function of Protein in the...

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Lecture 15 Beans
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Function of Protein in the Diet Protein, from the Greek proteou , meaning first Protein is required by every cell of the body for growth, maintenance, and repair of body tissues Only bile and urine do not normally contain protein
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Amino Acids Building blocks of proteins Proteins are polypeptide chains of amino acids 22 found in nature 8 or 9 (depending on age) are required by humans Required amino acids = essential amino acids
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PVT TIM HALL To remember essential amino acids For the rat Phenylalanine Valine Threonine Tryptophane Isoleucine Methionine Histidine human infant requires Arginine not required by human Leucine lysine
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Protein in Food Classed by amino acid content Complete proteins contain all essential amino acids in proportions capable of promoting growth Incomplete proteins lack 1 or more essential amino acids in sufficient amounts and are unable to provide amino acids necessary for synthesis of body protein.
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Vegetarian In the broadest definition, a vegetarian eats no meat, fish, or poultry. Instead, plant sources of protein—grains, legumes, nuts, vegetables and fruits are the primary components of the diet.
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Adoption of vegetarian eating behavior Religion Hindu Seventh-Day Adventist Cultural Personal Health Concerns for the environment Compassion for animals Belief in nonviolence
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Ovo Vegetarian Pyramid
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Vegetarian MyPyramid
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Vegan Food Pyramid
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Semi Vegetarian Not really vegetarian Excludes beef, veal, pork, lamb Game From the diet. Fish and poultry are consumed occasionally.
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Pullo Vegetarian The only animal flesh consumed is poultry
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Pesco vegetarian Cold blooded animals (fish, shellfish) are consumed. No other animal flesh is consumed
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Lacto-Ovo Vegetarian Dietary restriction which “fits” the definition of vegetarian Consumes milk, dairy products, eggs Lacto only Ovo only Most popular vegetarian diet in US
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Vegan All animal products are excluded from the diet. Does not use: honey, gelatin
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fruitatarian More restrictive than vegan, only vegetable fruits, nuts, and seeds are consumed. Only vegetable products which do not result in the destruction of the plant are consumed.
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What is fruitatarianism? According to the fruitatarian website: “fruitatarianism is a nutrition system and a life style.” “fruit is a live food!!! “fruit has the power and magic of life”
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www.thenewearth.org/fruit “a fruitarian eats lots of fruit, with some nuts and grains or products.” Tomatoes, avocados, mangoes, papayas, oranges, lemons, bananas No cabbage, lettuce leaves, bean sprouts, celery or root vegetables “As we become more aware of, and thus respectful of life in all its forms and manifestations, we are becoming more reluctant to take life, to eat other lifeforms and to consume the aura of fear and death. We begin to ask the very fundamental question:
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This note was uploaded on 11/20/2011 for the course FOOD SCI 709:201 taught by Professor Tangel during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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Lecture+15 - Lecture 15 Beans Function of Protein in the...

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