hw #6 - them live, their people were being snatched up...

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James Fisk UGC112 Laticia McNaughton #6 The African Slave trade existed for hundreds of years. Millions of Africans, men, women and children, were brought all across the world by Europeans, Muslims or anyone who could pay up. They were forced into labor for life. This mass exportation of Africa's population has significant effects on the entire continent. At first Africans were captured during raiding parties by their soon to be owners. Huge amount of human resource was being depleted out of Africa. The entire continents development was stunted because there were less people. Then Africans who had no choice but to join the growing slave market were rounding up and selling slaves to the slave ships themselves. The increased European presence also gave way for Africans to get their hands on European technology such as guns and cannons. While this did give them new technology and helped
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Unformatted text preview: them live, their people were being snatched up right under their noses. At the 19th century, Africa was truly under developed. The relationships between different African kingdoms and peoples turned into decentralized societies left alone and far from any source of cultural diffusion or growth. The slave trade and the troubles it brought also led to many ideologies and opinions of Africa and Africans to come about. People soon thought of Africans as savages and people who needed to be saved by slavers to bring them out of the uncivilized African Continent. Things like this eventually lead to racism towards black and Africans. European Governments would even intervene in African political and economic strives if they felt threatened because they were racist or they knew they could take advantage of the already weakened African nations....
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This note was uploaded on 11/18/2011 for the course UGC 112 taught by Professor Barry during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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