DanceUnit3 - Where is Dance? An image of the Melbourne...

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Where is Dance? An image of the Melbourne Recital Center, Melbourne, Australia. Image. Arnewde.com. 3 January 2011. Unit 3 Learning Objectives: 1. Students will develop an understanding of the different types of theater architecture and spaces where dance is presented. 2. Students will consider technical aspects of production as part of the performative experience, including costumes, lights, video, sets, and props. 3. Students will develop an appreciation of the ways in which performance spaces impact choreographic choices and audience perception. 4. Students will develop an appreciation of the ways in which performance spaces provide context and impact the meaning of dance. Theatrical Architecture It is believed that dance was first performed as part of religious rituals, and that Ancient theaters were often spaces in natural areas, like the Greek open-air "theatron" (seeing place) or temple courtyards. Today, theaters and concerts halls are the spaces in which you may commonly encounter dance, particularly professional dance companies. However, dance is performed many places, and while this lecture will introduce you to some of the basic terminology of traditional theater architecture, we will explore further the idea of space in location in the next lecture, "Spaces for Dance". The proscenium stage is the most commonly used for professional dance concerts. The theater looks like a picture frame and is named for the proscenium arch at the front of the stage through which the audience views the performance. Most of the action takes place behind the arch and a curtain can be used to hide the area from view of the audience.
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The extended apron, or thrust, stage projects out into the audience past the proscenium arch. The actors can move either in front or behind the arch, or perform exclusively in front of it. Because there is no curtain, if there is scenery, it is either changed quickly or not at all. The three-sided arena extends far enough into the audience that the side seats are turned to face the stage. All the dancing must be on the projected area; otherwise part of the audience would be prevented from seeing it. If there is scenery, it is done much the same as with the extended apron stage. The full arena is created when the audience surrounds the stage on all sides. While
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This note was uploaded on 11/19/2011 for the course DANCE 07:203:103 taught by Professor Professordarrahcarr during the Fall '11 term at Rutgers.

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DanceUnit3 - Where is Dance? An image of the Melbourne...

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