class+15+lecture

class+15+lecture - Sensation and Perception Class XV:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–14. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Sensation and Perception Class XV: Auditory Scene Perception
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hearing in the Environment 1 0
Background image of page 2
Sound Localization How do you locate a sound in space? Conceptually, this is a similar challenge to determining how far away a visual object is The solution is also similar: Compare the inputs to the two ears, which (like the two eyes) are in different places in space. Azimuth: The angle of a sound source on the horizon relative to a point in the center of the head between the ears Measured in degrees, with 0 degrees being straight ahead Angle increases clockwise, with 180 degrees being directly behind
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 10.1 Position detection by the visual and auditory systems
Background image of page 4
Sound Localization Interaural time differences (ITD): The difference in time between a sound arriving at one ear versus the other
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 10.3 Interaural time differences for sound sources varying in azimuth
Background image of page 6
Figure 10.4 Interaural time differences for different positions around the head
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Sound Localization Physiology of ITD Medial superior olive (MSO): A relay station in the brain stem where inputs from both ears contribute to detection of ITDs ITD detectors form connections from inputs coming from two ears during the first few months of life
Background image of page 8
Sound Localization Interaural level difference (ILD): The difference in level (intensity) between a sound arriving at one ear versus the other For frequencies greater than 1000 Hz, the head blocks some of the energy reaching the opposite ear ILD is largest at 90 degrees and –90 degrees; nonexistent for 0 degrees and 180 degrees ILD generally correlates with angle of sound source, but correlation is not quite as great as it is with ITDs
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 10.2 Ears receive slightly different inputs when the sound source is located on different sides
Background image of page 10
Figure 10.6 Interaural level differences for tones of different frequencies presented at different positions (Part 1)
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 10.6 Interaural level differences for tones of different frequencies presented at different positions (Part 2)
Background image of page 12
Sound Localization Physiology of ILDs: Lateral superior olive (LSO):
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 14
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/20/2011 for the course PYSCH 302 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 50

class+15+lecture - Sensation and Perception Class XV:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 14. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online