moby-dick2.slides - Herman Melville, Moby-Dick Introduction...

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Herman Melville, Moby-Dick Introduction to American Literature I November 7, 2011 Professor Iannini Rutgers University
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Quiz : (answer any 3) 1.Tell me something about the mates of the Pequod? What are their names? Where are they from? What are they like? 2.Tell me something about the harpooners? 3.Give me some details about Ahab’s physical appearance? 4.What is the mast-head? What does Ishmael do there? 5.What does Ahab nail to the mast while trying to persuade the crew to hunt Moby Dick? 6.What are some of the legends that most of the crew have heard about Moby Dick?
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HOW DOES THE NOVEL DRAMATIZE DIFFERENT MODES OF AGENCY?
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Lay not up treasures upon earth, where moth and rust doth corrupt, and where thieves break through and steal: But lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not break through nor steal: For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also. --Matthew 6:19-21
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Now while Peleg was vainly trying to mend a pen with his jack-knife, old Bildad, to my no small surprise, considering that he was such an interested party in these proceedings; Bildad never heeded us, but went on mumbling to himself out of his book, "LAY not up for yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth—” "Well, Captain Bildad," interrupted Peleg, "what d'ye say, what lay shall we give this young man?” ”Thou knowest best," was the sepulchral reply, "the seven hundred and seventy-seventh wouldn't be too much, would it?—'where moth and rust do corrupt, but LAY—’” LAY, indeed, thought I, and such a lay! the seven hundred and seventy- seventh! Well, old Bildad, you are determined that I, for one, shall not LAY up many LAYS here below, where moth and rust do corrupt. It was an exceedingly LONG LAY that, indeed; and though from the magnitude of the figure it might at first deceive a landsman, yet the slightest consideration will show that though seven hundred and seventy-seven is a pretty large number, yet, when you come to make a TEENTH of it, you will then see, I say, that the seven hundred and seventy-seventh part of a farthing is a good deal less than seven hundred and seventy-seven gold doubloons; and so I thought at the time. --continued on next slide
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"Why, blast your eyes, Bildad," cried Peleg, "thou dost not want to swindle this young man! he must have more than that." "Seven hundred and seventy-seventh," again said Bildad, without lifting his eyes; and then went on mumbling—"for where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.” "I am going to put him down for the three hundredth," said Peleg, "do ye hear that, Bildad! The three hundredth lay, I say. "Bildad laid down his book, and turning solemnly towards him said, "Captain Peleg, thou hast a generous heart; but thou must consider the duty thou owest to the other owners of this ship—widows and orphans, many of them—and that if we too abundantly reward the labors of this young man, we may be taking the bread from those widows and those orphans. The seven hundred and seventy-seventh lay, Captain Peleg.” --Melville, Moby-Dick , “The Ship” (85-86)
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moby-dick2.slides - Herman Melville, Moby-Dick Introduction...

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