moby-dick3.2011 - Herman Melville, Moby-Dick Introduction...

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Herman Melville, Moby-Dick Introduction to American Literature I November 9, 2011 Professor Iannini Rutgers University
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Quiz : (answer any 3) 1.In the “Whiteness of the Whale” Ishmael lists dozens of things, emotions and ideas that are commonly associated with the color white. Name one of them. 1.In your opinion, what does Ishmael think is the most important association with the color white? Why? 2.In a whale boat, what is “the line”? 3.According to Ishmael, what is the significance of the line? What does it teach you about life? 4.In the ritual at the end of “The Quarter-Deck” what do the harpooners drink from? 5.Tell me something about Fedallah.
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COSMOPOLITANISM The idea, normally opposed to nationalism, that all kinds of human ethnic groups belong to a single global community based on a shared morality
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"Hark ye yet again—the little lower layer. All visible objects, man, are but as pasteboard masks. But in each event—in the living act, the undoubted deed—there, some unknown but still reasoning thing puts forth the mouldings of its features from behind the unreasoning mask. If man will strike, strike through the mask! How can the prisoner reach outside except by thrusting through the wall? To me, the white whale is that wall, shoved near to me. Sometimes I think there's naught beyond. But 'tis enough. He tasks me; he heaps me; I see in him outrageous strength, with an inscrutable malice sinewing it. That inscrutable thing is chiefly what I hate; and be the white whale agent, or be the white whale principal, I will wreak that hate upon him. Talk not to me of blasphemy, man; I'd strike the sun if it insulted me. For could the sun do that, then could I do the other; since there is ever a sort of fair play herein, jealousy presiding over all creations. But not my master, man, is even that fair play. Who's over me? --Melville, Moby-Dick , chapter 36 “The Quarter-Deck” (178)
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The Sublime : “Sublimity, then, refers to the moment when the ability to apprehend, to know, and express a thought or sensation is defeated. Yet, through this very defeat, the mind gets a feeling for that which lies beyond thought and language.” --Phillip Shaw, The Sublime (Routledge, 2006)
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Kantian Philosophy : - Our world is composed of phenomena (the world of appearances) and noumena (the real world). We learn about phenomena through our senses (empiricism), but we only learn about the real world by using our Reason. - For Kant, one's inability to grasp the enormity of a sublime event such as an earthquake demonstrates inadequacy of one's sensibility and imagination. Simultaneously, one's ability to subsequently identify such an event as singular and whole indicates the superiority of one's cognitive, supersensible powers.
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All science has one aim, namely, to find a theory of nature. . . . Whenever
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moby-dick3.2011 - Herman Melville, Moby-Dick Introduction...

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