Frederick+Douglass+Lecture

Frederick+Douglass+Lecture - Narrative of the Life of...

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Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Donavan L. Ramon October 19 th 2011 Early American Literature
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Describe one of the violent scenes in the narrative. What does the violence consist of and how does it effect Douglass? How does Douglass critique Christianity in the text? There are several instances but just choose one.
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Writing Douglass’ text exemplifies the genre of the slave narrative. Freedom is intertwined with literacy. Writing is foregrounded from the start: the opening letters (Garrison & Phillips) and the assertion that his narrative was “written by himself.”
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Finding the Right Words All slave narrators have a hard time describing slavery. They all struggle to find “the right words” to narrate their lives and Douglass was no exception:
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When describing his Aunt Hester’s bloody body, he states “I wish I could commit to paper the feelings with which I beheld it” (2074). Though he has a hard time describing the scene, he does so quite eloquently: “He took her into the kitchen, and stripped her from neck to waist, leaving her neck, shoulders, and back, entirely naked. He then told her to cross her hands, calling her at the same time a d--d b--h. After crossing her hands, he tied them with a strong rope, and led her to a stool under a large hook in the joist, put in for the purpose. He made her get upon the stool, and tied her hands to the hook. She now stood fair for his infernal purpose. Her arms were stretched up at their full length, so that she stood upon the ends of her toes.
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I was so terrified and horror-stricken at the sight,
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This note was uploaded on 11/20/2011 for the course LITERTURE 350:227 taught by Professor Iannini during the Fall '11 term at Rutgers.

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Frederick+Douglass+Lecture - Narrative of the Life of...

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