Mather_Witchcraft.2011

Mather_Witchcraft.2011 - Mary Rowlandson (continued) &...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Mary Rowlandson (continued) Cotton Mather, Wonders of the Invisible World (1692) Introduction to American Literature Professor Iannini Rutgers University September 21, 2011
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
QUIZ : 1.What specific details do you remember about the way that Rowlandson describes her return to the Puritan captivity after she is finally released from captivity? For instance, how does she react when the ministers call for a day of public thanksgiving? Or what does she say about the kinds of memories of captivity that stay with her longest? Do you think that she feels reincorporated within her community? Or is she haunted by a persistent sense of isolation? How can you tell?
Background image of page 2
In the morning, when they understood that my child was dead they sent for me home to my master’s wigwam . . . I went to take up my dead child in my arms to carry it with me, but they bid me let it alone; there was no resisting, but go I must and leave it. When I had been at my master’s wigwam, I took the first opportunity I could get to go look after my dead child. When I came I asked them what they had done with it; then they told me it was upon the hill. Then they went and showed me where it was, where I saw the ground was newly digged, and there they told me they had buried it. There I left that child in the wilderness, and must commit it, and myself also in this wilderness condition, to Him who is above all. --Rowlandson, Narrative of the Captivity (240)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
CLERICAL INJUNCTIONS AGAINST EXCESSIVE MOURNING (GRIEF TABOO)
Background image of page 4
I went along that day mourning and lamenting, leaving farther my own country, and traveling into a vast and howling wilderness, and I understood something of Lot’s wife temptation, when she looked back. --Rowlandson, Narrative of the Captivity (244)
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
I cannot but take notice of the wonderful mercy of God to me in those afflictions, in sending me a Bible. One of the Indians that came from Medfield fight, had brought some plunder, came to me, and asked me, if I would have a Bible, he had got one in his basket. I was glad of it, and asked him, whether he thought the Indians would let me read? He answered, yes. So I took the Bible, and in that melancholy time, it came into my mind to read first the 28 th chapter of Deuteronomy, which I did, and when I had read it, my dark heart wrought on this manner:
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 17

Mather_Witchcraft.2011 - Mary Rowlandson (continued) &...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online