franklin.wheatley.2011

franklin.wheatley.2011 - American Enlightenment: Benjamin...

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American Enlightenment: Introduction to American Literature Professor Iannini Rutgers University October 3, 2011
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Quiz : 1. In the most famous section from Franklin’s Autobiography he describes the beginning of his “project of arriving at Moral Perfection.” Tell me some details about this project. How does Franklin go about it? How does he schedule his day, for instance, or keep track of his faults? What works? What goes wrong? How does it end? 2. Tell me one thing that you thought was funny about either Franklin’s “Way to Wealth” or “The Speech of Miss Polly Baker.” 3. Extra Credit: Tell me one thing that you thought was funny about Franklin’s “project of arriving at Moral Perfection” in the Autobiography .
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TRANSITION TO ENLIGHTENMENT
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LIBERATION VERSUS DOMINATION
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Satire : Use of sarcasm, irony and humor to expose human vice and folly.
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Abstracted from the Law, I cannot conceive (may it please your Honours) what the Nature of my Offense is. I have brought Five fine children into the World, at the risque of my Life; I have maintain’d them well by my own Industry, without burthening the Township, and would have done it better, if it had not been for the heavy Charges and Fines I have paid. Can it be a Crime (in the Nature of Things I mean) to add to the Number of the King’s Subjects, in a new Country that really wants People? I own it, I should think it a Praise-worthy, rather than a punishable Action. --Benjamin Franklin “The Speech of Polly Baker” (1747)
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. . . If I thought what you call a Sin, was really such, I could not presumptuously commit it. But, how can it believed, that Heaven is angry at my having Children, when to the little done by me towards it, God has been pleased to add his Divine Skill, and admirable Wormanship in the Formation of their Bodies, and crown’d it, by furnishing them with rational and immortal Souls. Forgive me, Gentlemen, if I talk a little extravagantly on these Matters; I am no Divine (continued on next slide”
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. . . But if you, Gentlemen, must be making Laws, do not turn natural and
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This note was uploaded on 11/20/2011 for the course LITERTURE 350:227 taught by Professor Iannini during the Fall '11 term at Rutgers.

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franklin.wheatley.2011 - American Enlightenment: Benjamin...

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