4 Postmodern Roman Referans.pdf - REFERENCE Bibliography wMalcolm Bradbury The Modern British Novel 1878-2001 London Penguin Books 2001(Part One

4 Postmodern Roman Referans.pdf - REFERENCE Bibliography...

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1 REFERENCE Bibliography: w Malcolm Bradbury, The Modern British Novel 1878-2001 . London: Penguin Books. 2001. (Part One: 1878-1945: 4. Closing Time in the Gardens 1930-1945) p.194-253 (Part Two: 1945-2001: 5. The Novel No Longer Novel? 1945-1954) p.253-313 w Linda Hutcheon, A Poetics of Postmodernism: History, Theory, Fiction . New York. Routledge. 1988 w Bran Nicol, The Cambridge Introduction to Postmodern Fiction Download PDF: _to_Postmod_BookFi_.pdf w B. McHale, L. Platt, The Cambridge History of Postmodern Literature . Cambridge University Press. 2016 w Patricia Waugh, Postmodernism: A Reader . London: Bloomsbury. 1992 CAUTION! Cites such as SHMOOP, GRADESAVER, ENDNOTES, LITCHARTS and BITESIZE ( ) can provide useful tools for study, but keep in mind that the are just that, a means to giving direction to your research and not an end in themselves. w Visual Material : ‘Brideshead Revisited’ (1981) Eleven part Granada Television drama adaptation Screen Adaptation: Derek Granger et al. YEL5AacGEMC7Z2&index=1
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2 ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’ (1984) Film Screen Adaptation : Michael Radford ‘Lord of the Flies’ (1963 ) Film Screen Adaptation: Peter Brook ‘Clockwork Orange’ (1971) Film Screen Adaptation: Stanley Kubrick 1. Evelyn Waugh, Brideshead Revisited . London: Penguin, (1945) 1985 The Guardian It’s All on Account of the War The Guardian Families in Literature: the Flytes in Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh The New York Times 30 Years Later, Revisiting ‘Brideshead’ Brideshead Revisited , By Evelyn Waugh: “My Theme Is Memory, That Winged Host” THE GUARDIAN 'It's all on account of the war' Why does Brideshead Revisited have such a strong hold on our imagination? Evelyn Waugh's beautiful dialogue plays its part, argues Christopher Hitchens, but the chief source of the novel's power is its summoning of innocence lost on the fields of Flanders. Never mind that the new film version is a travesty: go back to the book. Christopher Hitchens
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3 Jeremy Irons and Anthony Andrews in the 1981 TV series of Brideshead Revisited A s I drove away from a California screening of the new film version of Brideshead Revisited , I was amused to overhear the comments of my companions from the back seat. "I thought the one who played Jeremy Irons was a bit thin ..." "I liked the Anthony Andrews character better ... " It is more than a quarter of a century since the late William F Buckley introduced the Granada TV series to the American viewers of the Public Broadcasting System, and the residual effect is one of what Harold Isaacs once called "scratches on the mind": a very durable if sometimes vague cultural impression. (My son was born in 1984 and as I was carrying a teddy bear home, and happening that day to be wearing a white linen suit, I was astonished by the number of passers-by in Washington DC who shouted "Hi Sebastian!" at me as I tooled along.)
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