Develop potential alternatives

Develop potential alternatives - minutes to an hour. The...

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Develop potential alternatives Time pressures frequently cause a manager to move forward after considering only the first or most  obvious answers. However, successful problem solving requires thorough examination of the  challenge, and a quick answer may not result in a permanent solution. Thus, a manager should think  through and investigate several alternative solutions to a single problem before making a quick  decision. One of the best known methods for developing alternatives is through  brainstorming,  where a  group works together to generate ideas and alternative solutions. The assumption behind  brainstorming is that the group dynamic stimulates thinking — one person's ideas, no matter how  outrageous, can generate ideas from the others in the group. Ideally, this spawning of ideas is  contagious, and before long, lots of suggestions and ideas flow. Brainstorming usually requires 30 
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Unformatted text preview: minutes to an hour. The following specific rules should be followed during brainstorming sessions: • Concentrate on the problem at hand. This rule keeps the discussion very specific and avoids the group's tendency to address the events leading up to the current problem. • Entertain all ideas. In fact, the more ideas that come up, the better. In other words, there are no bad ideas. Encouragement of the group to freely offer all thoughts on the subject is important. Participants should be encouraged to present ideas no matter how ridiculous they seem, because such ideas may spark a creative thought on the part of someone else. • Refrain from allowing members to evaluate others' ideas on the spot. All judgments should be deferred until all thoughts are presented, and the group concurs on the best ideas....
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This note was uploaded on 11/18/2011 for the course MGMT 4375 taught by Professor Eixmann during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

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