Goldman Summary - Goldman Summary: In his attempt at the...

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Goldman Summary: In his attempt at the formation of a definition of sexual desire, Alan Goldman wishes to clearly encapsulate the lowest common denominator of sexuality. His view on sexual desire and activity does not carry any moral implication, and he merely wishes to explain what sex is as a “reflective equilibrium” between previously developed conceptual and normative descriptions. Goldman’s thinks sexual desire is the desire which we have for bodily contact with another human and the pleasure associated with such contact. It follows that sexual activity is the activity which allows the agent to have such desires satisfied. Central to this description, Goldman states that sexual desire is desire of physical contact itself, and not separable ends which the contact may indicate or communicate to others. Goldman criticizes four ends which other philosophers see as the meaning of sex. These ends are: 1) The purely biological end of reproduction 2) The demonstration and symbolization of love 3) Interpersonal awareness by the realization of your partner’s arousal, as stated by Thomas Nagel 4) Communication of certain emotions and personality traits through sexual language, according to Robert Solomon When Goldman looks at 1), he says that we must not only look at the biological purposes of sex in the natural world, but we must also look at our own psychological reasons for sex. I will criticize Goldman on the basis that nearly every other animal on the planet solely uses sex
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Goldman Summary - Goldman Summary: In his attempt at the...

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