Foreign policy and domestic issues

Foreign policy and domestic issues -...

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Foreign policy and domestic issues.  To its credit, the Grant administration settled the simmering dispute with Great Britain over the  damages caused by British-built Confederate ships during the Civil War. Both countries agreed in  1871 to allow an international tribunal to resolve the so-called Alabama claims, named for the  infamous Confederate raider. The tribunal ruled in favor of the United States, which was awarded  more than $15 million.  After the purchase of Alaska from Russia in 1867, some government officials looked for other  opportunities to expand beyond the continental United States. Although Congress had rejected  buying the Virgin Islands, Grant looked toward the Caribbean again in 1870. His treaty to annex  Santo Domingo (the Dominican Republic), however, did not even have the support of his cabinet,  and the Senate refused to ratify it. On the domestic side, Grant's first term was marred by scandals. The president's brother-in-law was 
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