Disarmament - Disarmament. Two factors prompted American...

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Unformatted text preview: Disarmament. Two factors prompted American calls for disarmament during the 1920s. First, many Americans believed the arms buildup, particularly the Anglo-German naval rivalry, was a cause of World War I and that reducing military strength would therefore help prevent another war. Furthermore, the United States was concerned that the growing military power of Japan, which had taken advantage of the war to seize German possessions in China and the western Pacific, was a threat to American interests in the region. Limiting Japan's military capabilities would protect those interests. At the Washington Armaments Conference (November 1921February 1922), the United States, Japan, Great Britain, France, and Italy signed the Five-Power Treaty, which limited the tonnage of their navies and placed a ten-year moratorium on the construction of aircraft carriers and battleships. The navies and placed a ten-year moratorium on the construction of aircraft carriers and battleships....
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