Jim Crow laws

Jim Crow laws - Jim Crow laws Jim Crow laws were Southern...

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Unformatted text preview: Jim Crow laws Jim Crow laws were Southern statutes that effectively segregated people by race. In a group of decisions known as the Civil Rights Cases (1883), the Supreme Court struck down the Civil Rights Act of 1875 that had forbidden racial segregation in public accommodations such as hotels and trains. Under the Jim Crow laws, separate facilities for black and white train and streetcar passengers, separate schools, and separate entrances and reception areas in public buildings were built in the South. Separate restrooms and drinking fountains, as well as special visiting hours for African Americans at museums, became fixtures of Southern life. Because this separation based on race was backed by law, it was called de jure segregation. Separate but equal doctrine In 1896, Homer Plessy challenged segregation by riding in a "white only" railroad car. The case went In 1896, Homer Plessy challenged segregation by riding in a "white only" railroad car....
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This note was uploaded on 11/20/2011 for the course POSI 1310 taught by Professor Arnold during the Spring '08 term at Texas State.

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