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The Supreme Court in Operation

The Supreme Court in Operation - McCulloch v Maryland(1819...

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The Supreme Court in Operation The Constitution implies, but does not specifically state, that the Supreme Court has the  power to declare laws unconstitutional, both those enacted by Congress and by the  states. The principle, which is known as  judicial review,  was firmly established in the  case of  Marbury v. Madison  (1803). The decision, issued by Chief Justice John  Marshall, was the first time the court invalidated an act of Congress (part of the  Judiciary Act of 1789). Under Marshall, other key cases were decided that strengthened  the position of the Supreme Court. In  Fletcher v. Peck  (1810), for example, the sanctity  of contracts was upheld and a state law was ruled unconstitutional.  The Supreme Court under Marshall practiced  judicial nationalism;  its decisions favored  the federal government at the expense of the states. In 
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Unformatted text preview: McCulloch v. Maryland (1819), it broadly defined the elastic clause by ruling that a state could not tax a federal bank, and in Gibbons v. Ogden (1824), it declared that a state could not regulate interstate commerce. The Court has not always supported a larger role for the federal government. It initially found much of President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal legislation unconstitutional, primarily for violating the economic rights of individuals and companies. Roosevelt responded by trying to increase the size of the Court, which would let him appoint new justices sympathetic to his program. This attempt to "pack" the Court failed, but around that time the Court began ruling in Roosevelt's favor anyway....
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