phaedrus paper

Phaedrus paper - based on their similarity of divine madness This was particularly interesting to us because love and rhetoric are such seemingly

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In Socrates’ second speech, he highlights the third type of speech: speech that can move the audience to good. In this speech, Socrates is able to express his honest opinion about love, rather than in his first speech where he simply regurgitated Lysias’ speech content. In his essay, Weaver illuminates the image of the Charioteer and how this imagery is much more imaginative than in the first speech, thus leading to a more convincing argument. Socrates is able to move the audience towards good in his second speech, which combines the elements of storytelling and passion to create a strong rhetorical piece. Weaver gives a brief, yet detailed, summary of Socrates’ second speech within his essay. Weaver asserts that there are two types of madness, simple degeneracy and inspirational madness of a true lover, which is an inspired madness because the lover is turned towards the divine beauty. As we talked about the three speeches, we found it particularly interesting and accurate when Weaver compared the noble lover to rhetoric
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Unformatted text preview: based on their similarity of divine madness. This was particularly interesting to us because love and rhetoric are such seemingly different entities that it didn’t seem likely to compare them to each other but when Weaver laid out his argument throughout the essay, we ended up really liking the comparison. When Weaver mentioned the Charioteer Myth of Socrates’ second speech, he wrote about how the rhetorician leads those who listen in the direction of good by giving impulse, particularly through figuration. So with the help of the myth that Socrates told in his speech, he was able to move the audience to good. This was an interesting perspective to take because Weaver also mentioned earlier in his speech that knowledge of the truth does not equate to persuasion. So this point was particularly emphasized with the myth because although the story of the Charioteer was a myth, it was still able to persuade the audience and ultimately lead them to good....
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This note was uploaded on 11/20/2011 for the course COMS 330 taught by Professor Duffy during the Spring '09 term at Cal Poly.

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Phaedrus paper - based on their similarity of divine madness This was particularly interesting to us because love and rhetoric are such seemingly

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