Mentoring vs Induction programs

Mentoring vs Induction programs - Mentoring Versus...

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Mentoring Versus Induction Programs Mentoring Versus Induction Programs Vicki Eller Axia College of University of Phoenix AED 201 Instructor: Dr. Elisabeth Weinbaum May, 2008 1
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Mentoring Versus Induction Programs Abstract In this paper we will explore induction and mentoring programs in the context of overall effectiveness in lowering the attrition rate of teachers in the education profession. What exactly are the challenges? What methods are showing promising results with either program, and what may make one program more effective than the other? I will consider my personal role, desired involvement, and potential contribution to both programs. In conclusion this paper will summarize various challenges as well as benefits to contemplate possible options for improving both programs. 2
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Introduction Lack of teacher socialization appears to be one of the main reasons new teachers leave the profession in the early years (Feiman et al., 1999). It is not that induction is something new, it has always existed but not through formal processes such that exist today. Although higher education has begun to take significant steps in educating prospective teachers while they are completing their degrees, many teachers still enter the classroom world with many misconceptions. Just as any company offers a time of probation to learn the ins and outs of an organization through on-the-job training programs and tutorials, formal induction and mentoring programs carry the same intent. Induction programs for new teachers can consist of internships, classroom observation, and workshops or other events that are geared towards helping new teachers understand, face challenges, and how to address those relative issues. This approach is becoming more universal and common and some states are making participation mandatory such as Connecticut and Florida (APEC, 2005). Induction programs can also include mentoring although some districts and states offer mentoring as a separate stand-alone program. Effective induction programs are proving to be a most critical time for professional development for those entering the education profession. Unlike the induction program model mentoring is intended to provide a more personal and individual long-term support structure for the new teacher. As induction programs assume an end to the initiation process; mentoring challenges those borders and seeks to meet the beginning teacher’s needs as long as necessary or possible. Through mentoring programs new teachers are assigned a specific person who is either an expert teacher or is tenured in the district. This allows the new teacher to have someone in confidence to turn to for assistance, guidance, to express 3
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This note was uploaded on 08/07/2011 for the course EDUCATION 101 taught by Professor None during the Spring '11 term at University of Phoenix.

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Mentoring vs Induction programs - Mentoring Versus...

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