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Defamation II (Defences & Remedies)- Worksheet

Defamation II (Defences & Remedies)- Worksheet -...

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NGEE ANN POLYTECHNIC SCHOOL OF FILM & MEDIA STUDIES MEDIA LAW: DEFAMATION 1 LECTURE / TUTORIAL WORKSHEET CONCEPT OF DEFAMATION – REVIEW -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- ---------------------- ---------------------- ---------------------- ---------------------- ---------------------- ---------------------- ---------------------- ---------------------- ---------------------- 1. DEFENCES What is a defence? ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Defamation Libel Must refer to Plaintiff
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What is malice? ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ A) JUSTIFICATION What does justification means? ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ What must the defendant show / prove? (i) Facts allegedly must be substantially true ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ (ii) Every material fact must be justified ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ List instances when defendant may not be able to plead justification (i) ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ (ii) ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________
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(iii) ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ Effect of malice ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ B) ABSOLUTE PRIVILEGE What does privilege means? ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ What is absolute privilege? ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Some examples of absolute privilege: Judicial proceedings ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________
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C) QUALIFIED PRIVILEGE What is qualified privilege? A privileged occasion is an occasion when the person who makes the communication has an interest or a duty, legal, social or moral, to make it to the person to whom it is made; and __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ Privilege can be lost if: ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Aaron & Ors v Cheong Yip Seng & Ors [1996] 1 SLR 623 What happened in this case?
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