africanity - Patel Housienna Olido 28 April 2011 Couscous:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Patel Housienna Olido 28 April 2011 Couscous: Basic Overview and Comparison with Couscous in Morocco, Tunisia, Mali and Senegal Couscous
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Patel Kitty Morse once said, “What pasta is to Italians, what rice is to the Chinese, couscous is to the people of the Maghreb. It has been a staple of the diet and a presence in the culture of North Africa for more than 1000 years.” It is essential to understand that since its origin, Couscous has gained much acceptance worldwide. It is a national dish of the countries of Maghreb that is, Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia, and has gain a major acceptance in countries like (Tripolitania, Mauritania, Egypt, and sub-Saharan countries). “Couscous is a staple food throughout West Africa, Sahel, France, Spain, and the Canary Islands, Portugal, Madeira, Italy (particularly in western Sicily's Province of Trapani), as well as in Turkey, Greece, Malta, Cyprus, the Middle East and India” (Wikipedia). We can see that the presence and its influence are enormous, so it is vital to understand and compare the couscous of different cultures or nations ranging from Morocco, Tunisia, Mali and Senegal. At the same time, it is imperative to understand the roles, traditions, cultures, history, and agriculture to understand how Couscous would vary from one region to the next. It is first essential to understand gain a brief overview about couscous. For many, couscous can be compared to pasta. As Kate Perry, a food historian states, “Couscous itself is hard-wheat semolina, which is rolled by hand in a variety of consistencies and characteristics” So basically it is made from semolina which is steamed and then combined with other ingredients as lamb, fish, meat, etc. Sweet couscous may also be served as dessert with buttermilk and embellished with fruits (dates, pomegranate, almonds and grapes). A good couscous is described by the lack of lumps in the steamed semolina so this is why hand-rolling semolina is considered an art. She further described to us the process which requires patience and experience stating, “…A bowl of flour is sprinkled intermittently with salted water as the fingers of the right hand rake through it in sweeping, circular movements, causing balls of dough to
Background image of page 2
Patel coagulate. The granules are also rubbed between the palms or against the side of the bowl to shape them, and when complete they are dried.” We must understand that this task itself is time- consuming process but in the end we attain the fruit of it. Being a traditional dish of the Maghreb countries and culture it is vital to understand its influence and significance as to the importance of such a dish. It is said that in the North African countries they traditionally prepare in the fall their yearly supply of couscous. Being a staple food of such countries we must also see what is symbolizes. In North African tradition symbolizes luck, blessings, abundance and happiness. It symbolizes blessings because some in these countries give it to the poor as charity in order to gather blessings for the family. At the
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/19/2011 for the course AFRICANA 101 taught by Professor Ollideo during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 15

africanity - Patel Housienna Olido 28 April 2011 Couscous:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online