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American's Rights to Own Guns - Americans Rights to Own...

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American’s Rights to Own Guns 1 Gun Control: American’s Rights to Own Guns COM/220
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American’s Rights to Own Guns 2 Why should an upstanding law abiding American citizen be kept from the constitutional rights of owning a gun? Many Americans own guns for the simple fact of hunting to provide food for their families as well as for protecting themselves. Throughout history there are many accounts of a strong American gun culture namely the emotional ties drawn to past ancestors. Gun control has been an ongoing controversial issue with differing views of whether or not it creates a safer society. Both the opposition and supporters of gun control ultimately want the same outcome. Options do exist, other than the extreme measures that each side of the issue may believe. While some argue that gun control reduces crime and violence, the government should not interfere with American citizens constitutional rights to keep and bear arms. Guns have been a part of the American culture from the very start and founding of the United States of America. Historical accounts indicate that guns were used mainly in defending colonial homes from Native Americans, foreign armies, and wild animals. Contrary to many beliefs that most Americans owned or had access to guns, the American people found it necessary to learn how to use and own guns because of the wild conditions of the new world. According to Gun Culture (2003), “The myth of the militia and the American fighting man is predicated on the assumption that, at least in the past, all or most American men owned firearms and were proficient in their use. But recent historians point out that Americans, even on the frontier, did not own guns, nor were they familiar with their use and handling.” (p. 1). The battles against Native Americans and the Civil War caused unrest and produced a need of the American people to protect themselves and their families with gun ownership.
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American’s Rights to Own Guns 3 War times throughout American history have played a part in the growth of the American gun culture. Popularity of gun ownership has been caused by the desire of owning guns that have been involved in actual battles. The intrigue grows stronger when the firearms have been used in battle by a family member or ancestor. Gun Culture (2003) states, “Guns represent both a concrete and a spiritual-emotional link to the heroic past. Weapons that have been used in combat or that have personal connections are especially valued.” (p. 2). Gun collectors and enthusiasts have grown more and more
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