CheckPoint - Causation of Crime

CheckPoint - Causation of Crime - CheckPoint Causation of...

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CheckPoint: Causation of Crime CJS/200 Social process theories and life course theories both agree that a person’s behavior is influenced by the environment that surrounds them. Both theories suggest that one who is raised by or taught a negative or destructive nature is more likely to possess criminal urges. The early childhood problems as in the life course theory and the interactions that influence one as in the social process theory are a like in the possible outcome of a personality trait that can lead to criminal behavior. The social process theory establishes that crime is a learned behavior, where as, the life course theory is based on early childhood misbehavior not being corrected. Those that form a desire to commit criminal acts because of the manner in which they have been taught are different from those that become criminals because of the lack of guidance they received at an early age. The life course theory that focuses on early childhood behavior could be related to one’s family functionality or adhesiveness. One that is raised
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This note was uploaded on 11/19/2011 for the course CRIM JUSTI CJS 230 taught by Professor None during the Winter '11 term at University of Phoenix.

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CheckPoint - Causation of Crime - CheckPoint Causation of...

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