Final - Historical Events Leading to the Civil War

Final - Historical Events Leading to the Civil War -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Historical Events Leading to the Civil War 1 Historical Events Leading to the Civil War HIS / 115
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Historical Events Leading to the Civil War 2 Historical battles between the Union and Confederate Armies are often the visual thoughts derived from events of the Civil War. Slavery was a key factor that fueled the conflict between the North and South but many other factors prompted the first shots. The newfound freedom established by defeating the royal rule of Great Britain provided much the same division as it did unity of the North and South. Although American colonies had come together to gain independence as a new world, many political, social, and economical aspects were far reaching in ideology. The following timeline indicates some of the events, factors, and changes that contributed to the Civil War. 1730s: The First Great Awakening Religious revivals presented social and cultural gatherings but also provided heightened religious divisions among Americans. 1751: Franklin’s Essay on Population Explosion Benjamin Franklin’s opinion of the population explosion after the 1700s indicates some aspects contributing to political and social division among Americans. 1776: The Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence proclaimed the independence from Great Britain but provided separation of states. 1787: Northwest Ordinance The Northwest Ordinance established a design to implement political representation into westward expansion as populations grew. The ordinance also guaranteed basic rights
Background image of page 2
3 (without consideration of Native Americans) and outlawed slavery throughout the territory. 1790: Ratifying the Constitution The ratification of the Constitution had been voted in by May 1790 establishing a new form government. Although the purpose was to provide power to the people, many states reluctantly voted in favor. 1791: The Bill of Rights “The first 10 amendments, known as the Bill of Rights, were destined to be of crucial importance in defining personal liberty in the United States.” (Davidson, 2006, p. 210). 1801: Cane Ridge The Second Great Awakening became a major factor of religious revivals at Cane Ridge, Kentucky, and spurred strong support to anti-slavery movements. 1812: The War of 1812 The war of 1812 re-established American independence from Great Britain but creative division prior to the war between the North and South. 1820: The Missouri Compromise The Missouri Compromise admitted Missouri as a slave state and Maine as a free state while also prohibiting slavery beyond the southern boundary of Missouri. The compromise created fear in both the North and the South. 1832: New England Anti-Slavery Society
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/19/2011 for the course CRIM JUSTI CJS 230 taught by Professor None during the Winter '11 term at University of Phoenix.

Page1 / 10

Final - Historical Events Leading to the Civil War -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online