WEEK1--New Worlds for All TO

WEEK1--New Worlds for All TO - AMH 2010 Terms and Outline...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
AMH 2010 Terms and Outline WEEK 1::New Worlds for All Search for the Commons: Colonization and Contact in the New World What do a 15th century Arawak and an 18th century Virginian have in common? This first set of lectures focuses on the two centuries between 1492 and the eve of the American Revolution. Typically, the “New World” refers only to a limited time, place, and set of meetings—the period of initial European colonization in the Americas and its impact on certain Native Americans. Historians then refer to the rest of the history that precedes the American Revolution as generic “colonial” history. That model is useful, but it also is very limited. When we step back and assess these centuries more broadly, we can see larger themes uniting the experiences of many more people across both time and space. That theme is an almost universal search for economic opportunity, social mobility, political and diplomatic autonomy, religious security, and literal access to the means to make a living in the world. Collectively, those aspirations and rewards are something I call “the commons.” In every clash, every trade, and every bloody or peaceful
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This document was uploaded on 11/21/2011.

Page1 / 4

WEEK1--New Worlds for All TO - AMH 2010 Terms and Outline...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online