122705_FarmingtonReport

122705_FarmingtonReport - _ The Farmington Report: Civil...

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____________________________ The Farmington Report: Civil Rights for Native Americans 30 Years Later __________________________________________________________ New Mexico Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights [November 2005] This report of the New Mexico Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights was prepared for the information and consideration of the Commission. Statements and viewpoints in this report should not be attributed to the Commission, but only to the participants at the community forum, other individuals or documents cited, of the Advisory Committee. The findings and recommendations in this report should not be attributed to the Commission, but only to the New Mexico Advisory Committee.
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The United States Commission on Civil Rights The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights is an independent, bipartisan agency established by Congress in 1957, reconstituted in 1983, and reauthorized in 1994. It is directed to investigate complaints alleging that citizens are being deprived of their right to vote by reason of their race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin, or by reason of fraudulent practices; study and collect information relating to discrimination or a denial of equal protection of the laws under the Constitution because of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin, or in the administration of justice; appraise federal laws and policies with respect to discrimination or denial of equal protection of the laws because of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin, or in the administration of justice; serve as a national clearinghouse for information in respect to discrimination or denial of equal protection of the laws because of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin; submit reports, findings, and recommendations to the President and Congress; and issue public service announcements to discourage discrimination or denial of equal protection of the laws. The State Advisory Committees By law, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights has established an advisory committee in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The committees are composed of state citizens who serve without compensation. The committees advise the Commission of civil rights issues in their states that are within the Commission’s jurisdiction. More specifically, they are authorized to advise the Commission on matters of their state’s concern in the preparation of Commission reports to the President and the Congress; receive reports, suggestions, and recommendations from individuals, public officials, and representatives of public and private organizations to committee inquiries; forward advice and recommendations to the Commission, as requested; and observe any open hearing or conference conducted by the Commission in their states. ________________________________________________________ This report is available on disk in ASCII and WordPerfect 5.1 for persons with visual
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2008 for the course HIST 210 taught by Professor Herry during the Spring '08 term at UPenn.

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122705_FarmingtonReport - _ The Farmington Report: Civil...

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