RDanemia - ANEMIA Anemia Marla A. Graham Ivy Tech State...

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ANEMIA Anemia Marla A. Graham Ivy Tech State College Fall 2011 Abstract Anemia is a common worldwide disease affecting persons of all ages. This greater disease burden is due to both nutrition and chronic conditions. A person’s body reduces the functioning of his/her red blood cells causing anemia. There are hundreds of types of anemia and some of them may result from iron deficiency, vitamin deficiency, lowered levels of iron and folic acid during pregnancy, premature destruction of red blood cells, or from being genetically inherited. Implications for diagnosis and treatments for anemia will be discussed in this paper. Also
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ANEMIA included in this paper, is current research on elderly being diagnosed with anemia and an educational plan to assist individuals in understanding anemia. Anemia can be defined as a decrease in the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood caused by low hemoglobin concentration (What is anemia, 2008). Cells in the body require oxygen to fully utilize fuels. The oxygen is transported from the lungs to tissues throughout the body via red blood cells. Oxygen binds to hemoglobin, a specific molecule within each red blood cell. This molecule consists of heme, which is a red pigment, and globin, which is a protein. If the amount of functioning hemoglobin is reduced, a condition known as anemia arises (What is anemia, 2008). Anemia is not considered to be a specific disease; it is a manifestation of many abnormal conditions. Anemia is one of the most common blood disorders. Anemia occurs when the level of healthy red blood cells in the body become too low. A person who is diagnosed with anemia is called “anemic,” and is occasionally described by doctors as having a low blood count (What is anemia, 2008). Surprisingly, there are over 400 types of anemia (What is anemia, 2010). Anemia has three main causes: blood loss, lack of red blood cell production, or high rates of red blood cell
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ANEMIA destruction (What is anemia, 2010). These causes may be due to a number of diseases, conditions, or other factors. Blood loss is the most common cause of anemia, especially iron- deficiency anemia. Blood loss can be either short term or long term. Both acquired and inherited conditions along with factors can prevent the body from making enough red blood cells. Acquired conditions are when a patient is not born with the condition, and inherited conditions means the parents passed the gene for the condition. A diet that lacks iron, folic acid, or vitamin B12 can prevent the body from making enough red blood cells. Our body needs small amounts of vitamin C, riboflavin, and copper to make red blood cells. The hormone, erythropoietin, is also important to our body for making red blood cells. Erythropoietin stimulates the bone marrow to make RBCs. A low level erythropoietin of this hormone can lead to anemia. Chronic and long-term diseases such as, kidney disease and cancer, can make it hard for the body to make enough red blood cells (What is anemia, 2010). Anemia can occur during pregnancy due to low levels of iron and folic acid and changes
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RDanemia - ANEMIA Anemia Marla A. Graham Ivy Tech State...

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