A3-ques - Stat231-Assignment 3 Family (last) Name: Section...

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Unformatted text preview: Stat231-Assignment 3 Family (last) Name: Section #: Given (&rst) Name: Grade = ID: Marks Available: Due Date: Thursday Nov 8th 2007, 10 am in the Tutorial Centre MC6094/MC6095. General Rules: 1. Although it is understood that some measure of collaboration will occur in the assignments, the work you hand in must be your own and differ from those of your compatriots. All help should be cited. Excessive collaboration (ie. copying) is not acceptable. Please read the university policies on what other things constitute cheating. 2. Late assignments will not be accepted. The tutorial center will be staffed from 8am until 10am on the date the assignment is handed.in. 3. You must print this assignment and put your solutions ON the assignment pages. The only exception(s) to this policy will be the course note homework. Course note homework can be attached to the END of the assignment. Please use the back if you need more space and CLEARLY indicate where the solution has gone. 4. All graphical displays should be properly labelled and titled. 5. All R graphics output (ie. plots) should be cut and paste into your assignment. 6. YOU MAY ONLY USE R IN A QUESTION THAT TELLS YOU SO. 7. In all cases show your work. Grades are given for the clarity of your responses. Reading the data table into R (Question 2) 1. Use the &le on UWACE: Assignment 2 Code, found in the Assignment 2 folder. The Story The effects of smoking are usually an interesting problem to investigate statistically. One such study was performed in the mid to late 1970s. At the time a sample of 654 youths (aged 3 to 19) from Boston was taken. The objective of the study was to measure the effects of smoking on FEV (Forced Expiratory Volume). FEV is the amount of air you can exhale in one second of a forceful breath. Source: Forced Expiratory Volume, Journal of Statistics Education, Volume 13, Number 2 (July 2005).. The Story Thus Far....The Story Thus Far....
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A3-ques - Stat231-Assignment 3 Family (last) Name: Section...

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