The social structure and lifestyles of the 1960s Counterculture the people involved were mostly youn

The social structure and lifestyles of the 1960s Counterculture the people involved were mostly youn

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The social structure and lifestyles of the 1960s Counterculture the people involved were mostly young middle class, took on a lifestyle that involved personal freedom while refusing to follow the thinking of capitalism, conformity, and repressive sexual mores. The media would refer to the people of the counterculture as " hippies ," "freaks," or "flower children." The counterculture was no more a "culture" than the diverse antiwar movement was a "movement." Rather, the term was applied by social critics attempting to characterize the widespread rebellion of many western youths against the values and behaviors espoused by their parents. However, many young people adopted certain counterculture trappings, such as those involving music, fashion, slang, or recreational drugs, without necessarily abandoning their middle-class mores. Various factors nurtured the counterculture, including the postwar growth of the American middle class (whose "materialism" the counterculture disdained), wide availability of "
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This note was uploaded on 11/21/2011 for the course AMERICAN H 125 taught by Professor Rossman during the Spring '11 term at University of Phoenix.

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The social structure and lifestyles of the 1960s Counterculture the people involved were mostly youn

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