Wk9DQ2 - age groups. More times than not, people conform to...

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Conformity involves the changing of one's attitudes, opinions, or behaviors to match the attitudes, opinions, or behaviors of other people. This pressure to act like other people, sometimes despite our true feelings and desires, is a common everyday occurrence. This influence occurs in both small groups and society as a whole, and it may be the result of subtle unconscious influences, or direct and overt social pressure. Conformity also occurs by the "implied presence" of others, or when other people are not actually present. People often conform from a desire to achieve a sense of security within a group; a group that is typically of the same age, culture, religion, or educational status. Any unwillingness to conform carries with it the very real risk of being rejected. Conformity is often associated with adolescence and younger generation, but it definitely affects all
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Unformatted text preview: age groups. More times than not, people conform to fit in with the rest of the group. This involves changing their behavior or opinion. Majority influence can play a huge part on the reason why people conform. People are more easily influenced if the majority of the group decide the same thing, rather than if just one person has an independent view. Therefore the larger the group with the same decision, the easier it is for them to influence a person, as there will be more pressure to comply. Another thing to think about is society, media, and many people think that woman should be thin and that is unrealistic for many but we as woman try to conform to what they all think. Same with men, they are “supposed” to be fit and muscular so therefore they try to conform to what society and the media say....
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This note was uploaded on 11/21/2011 for the course PSY 201 201 taught by Professor Peters during the Spring '11 term at University of Phoenix.

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