ANAT 1507 Upper Extremity Joints and Key Info powerpoint

ANAT 1507 Upper Extremity Joints and Key Info powerpoint -...

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Major Joints of the Upper Limb. Barbara Kraszpulska, Ph.D. West Virginia University, School of Medicine Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy
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Typical features of synovial joints articular cartilage covers the bones ends: hyaline, avascular, aneural joint cavity – a potential space contains the small amount of synovial fluid articular or joint capsule a) inner or synovial membrane: highly vascular, produces synovial fluid (nutrition and lubrication) b) outer or fibrous membrane: rich nerve/blood supply
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Glenohumeral = Shoulder Joint                     Bones: 1. Large, round head of the humerus 2. Shallow glenoid cavity of the scapula Glenoid cavity is slightly deepened by the fibrocartilage element – glenoid labrum ! Joint capsule: Remarkably thin and loose, extends from the margin of the glenoid cavity to the anatomical neck of the humerus! What part of the joint capsule is the weakest one and why? The inferior part, because this is the only part, which is not reinforced by the rotator cuff muscles!
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tendon synovial sheet transverse humeral lig. coracohumeral lig. Intrinsic lig. coracoacromial lig. glenohumeral lig. Intrinsic lig. subscapular bursa subacromial bursa Ligaments of the Glenohumeral Joint Bursae are closed, partially collapsed balloon containing synovial fluid.They are located between any two of bone, tendon, muscle or skin and they prevent these organs to rub against each other. They serve to reduce friction! Tendon sheaths are similar to bursae, but differ in shape. They look like sausage-shaped balloons that wrap around long tendons subjected to friction.
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Movements of the Glenohumeral Joint This is multiaxial ball and socket joint Flexion - Extention Abduction - Adduction Rotation – Medial and Lateral Circumduction – combination of flexion, extension, abduction and adduction.
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Muscles moving the Glenohumeral Joint MM ATTACH HUMERUS TO AXIAL SKELETON 1. Latissimus Dorsi 2. Pectoralis Major MM ATTACH HUMERUS TO THE SCAPULA 1. Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus 2. Subscapularis 3. Teres Minor 4. Teres Major 5. Deltoid } rotator cuff MUSCLES OF THE ARM 1. Biceps brachii 2. Triceps brachii 3. Coracobrachialis
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Muscles moving the Glenohumeral Joint FLEXION: Pectoralis major, Deltoid (ant.part), Coracobrachialis, Biceps EXTENSION: Latissimus dorsi, Deltoid (post.part), Teres major ABDUCTION: Deltoid (as a whole, but especially central part), Supraspinatus ADDUCTION: Pectoralis major, Latissimus dorsi, Teres major, Teres minor, Infraspinatus, Subscapularis LATERAL ROTATION: Infraspinatus, Teres minor, Deltoid (post.part) MEDIAL ROTATION: Subscapularis, Pectoralis major, Latissimus dorsi, Teres major, Deltoid (ant. part)
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Innervation and Blood Supply of the Glenohumeral Joint Nerves of the Shoulder Joint: * Suprascapular * Axillary * Lateral pectoral Arteries of the Shoulder Joint:
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ANAT 1507 Upper Extremity Joints and Key Info powerpoint -...

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