Haka - Haka Arin Aberasturi What is it Traditional...

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Haka Arin Aberasturi
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What is it Traditional full-body dances of Polynesian tribes. The most notable examples today are those haka of the Maori tribe of New Zealand.
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Where does it come from According to legend, the haka was derived from the sun god Ra. He lay with one of his wives, Hine-raumati called “the essence of summer”, and they then received a son called Tanerore. On hot summer days you can see a shimmering in the air; this is Tanerore dancing for his
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Where does it come from 2 The first use of the haka is attributed to a chief named Tinirau and some of the tribes women. Tinirau desired revenge for the killing of a pet whale by a man called Kae. He sent a hunting party of women to Kaes’ village to find him. The women didn’t know what Kae looked like, but they did know that he had very uneven teeth. When they arrived at the village, they performed a haka in
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course REL 202 taught by Professor Sharendalearoam during the Spring '11 term at Chandler-Gilbert Community College.

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Haka - Haka Arin Aberasturi What is it Traditional...

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