Tactics

Tactics - Negotiation Strategies Definition of strategy A...

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Negotiation Strategies Definition of “strategy” A plan of action intended to accomplish a specific goal.
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Two Kinds of Negotiation Strategies Distributive (Positional) Goal is to “win” Competitive Zero sum Win-lose Claiming value Fixed resources to be divided Integrative (Principled) Goal is “mutual gain” Collaborative Win-win Creating value Variable amount of resources to be divided Dominant concern is to maximize joint outcomes
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Integrative Tactics Focus on interests , not positions Build trust and share information Search for joint gains (inquire, make simultaneous multiple offers, ask for proposals, etc.) Brainstorm multiple options (open communications) Use objective criteria to evaluate options Look for options to expand the pie
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A Third (and most often-used) Strategy Mixed-Motive ü Both Integrative ( expanding the pie;) – meeting the needs of most parties as much as possible ü And Distributive ( claiming your share; (claiming value) Most negotiations require us both to cooperate to create value and compete to claim value The ability to move back and forth between these two goals is a critical—and difficult—skill.
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Remember… Prepare, Prepare, Prepare Listen for interests ü Ask for more information and clarification Reframe to expand the pie by: ü Expanding the issues, ü Changing the timeframe ü Reframing is a valuable skill/tool/tactic Always ask, “Can we do better?” (post-settlement settlement)
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Getting to Yes Positional Bargaining Principled Bargaining ü Separate the people from the problem ü Focus on interests instead of positions ü Invent options for mutual gain ü Insist on using objective criteria
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Tactics Defined as: intentional maneuvers (sometimes “hardball”) designed to gain an edge (advantage), or to counter-act a tactic being used by the other party
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Basic Observations About Tactics Everyone uses negotiation tactics to get what they want. Most of the time, you can expect the other party to use certain maneuvers to tip the scales in their favor. Some tactics are acceptable, while others are downright sleazy. Some tactics are simply tools to expedite the negotiation process; others are used in an attempt to take advantage of the other person To be successful, you must be able to differentiate between the fair and unfair negotiation tactics so you can use the good ones to your advantage and deflect the questionable ones.
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Some Common Tactics including …and how to deal with
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A common tactic used in sales negotiations. Small extra requested (usually at closing stage) Works because of time/effort invested; you don’t want it to go down the drain Example: “I’ll take the computer if you will throw in free maintenance for a year.” Counter Tactic: Recognize the tactic for what it is. Give them the add on if you would have anyway.
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Tactics - Negotiation Strategies Definition of strategy A...

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