Comparing Literature ENG 125FINAL

Comparing Literature ENG 125FINAL - Compare Literature...

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Compare Literature 1 Running head: Comparing Literature Comparing Literature Luke Boyd Eng 125: Marc McGrath July 26, 2010
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Compare Literature 2 Abstract In my final essay for this course, I have chosen to compare a poem and two short stories, all of which I thoroughly enjoyed reading and analyzing. Anne Bradstreet’s poem “To My Dear and Loving Husband,” and the stories “A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner and “The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky,” by Stephen Crane are the works that I have chosen to analyze and compare. In reading these poems I have discovered a close relationship between the characters and the descriptions each writer uses to draw their readers into their works.
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Compare Literature 3 Comparing Literature There are many examples of written feelings of our senses when each of the authors illustrates their characters and the buildings in their stories and poem. William Faulkner does a great job when he describes how Emily looked going into the meeting with the Board of Alderman, and when he described Emily’s house. “A big squarish frame house that had once been white” (DiYanni 2007; Faulkner p. 79), is the illustration Faulkner gave of the house, and Emily’s look is described as, “a small, fat woman in black, with a thin gold chain descending to her waist and vanishing into her belt, leaning on an ebony cane with a tarnished gold head” (DiYanni 2007; Faulkner p. 79). Faulkner also gives a great detailed description of Emily’s suitor and after reading that the reader can really grasp the scenario the author is painting and the reader is able to gather the musty dank feeling, and it almost makes the reader cringe with realism, it is definitely well written. Stephen Crane does a great job in his portrayal of his character, Emily. He says, “The blushes caused by the careless scrutiny of some passengers as she had entered the car were strange to see upon this plain, under-class countenance, which was drawn in placid, almost emotionless lines” (DiYanni 2007; Crane p. 482). Crane also does a great job when he describes Jack. He is described as, “his face reddened from many days in the wind and sun” (DiYanni 2007; Crane p. 482). These descriptions allows the reader to really start thinking about the look and feeling the story is going and allows the author to set the scene.
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Compare Literature 4 In the poem “To My Dear and Loving Husband” I was drawn in and as I read I could picture my own parents and how much in love they were, and this poem just brought back such a flood of emotions. In the lines “Then while we live, in love let’s so pers`ever that when we live no more, we may live ever” (DiYanni 2007; Bradstreet p.1077). This just touched me and made me think of the story “A Rose for Emily” that maybe this is why she killed Homer Barron.
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This note was uploaded on 11/21/2011 for the course ORGANIZATI 201 taught by Professor Pope during the Spring '11 term at Ashford University.

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Comparing Literature ENG 125FINAL - Compare Literature...

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