ANLS 1618 Fixation Theories Updated (Lecture Week 9-10)

ANLS 1618 Fixation Theories Updated (Lecture Week 9-10) -...

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Theory of fixations Others attribute fixations to mechanical joint locking, disc displacement or intra-articular jamming of various tissues.
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Muscular influence Voluntary movement of the spine is the result of long spinal muscle Movement at the segmental level is produced by short intersegmental muscles ie. Interspinalis,intertransversis,rotatories & deep multifidus- CORE MUSCLES appear to be the segment stabilizers during motion
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Muscle spindle
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Muscle spindle Muscle spindles are sensory receptors within the belly of a muscle , which primarily detect changes in the length of this muscle. They convey length information to the central nervous system via sensory neurons . This information can be processed by the brain to determine the position of body parts. Changes in length detected by muscle spindles also plays an important role in regulating the contraction of muscles, by preventing unwanted stretching.
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Korr theory Abberant muscle spindle activity spindle as the coordinator of muscle activity
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ANLS 1618 Fixation Theories Updated (Lecture Week 9-10) -...

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