twelfth night - Jessica Shelby Professor Watts IAH 207 sec...

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Jessica Shelby Professor Watts IAH 207 sec 19 29 September 2010 Relationship Differences between Different Social Classes The comedic play Twelfth Night was written by William Shakespeare. Like most comedies, everything works out in the end, but along the way important everyday themes are used to prove some point. In Twelfth Night the characters that are considered ranked high up in their social class are caught up in a crazy love triangle because one of the characters, Viola, pretends to be someone she is not. In the end, the confusion is cleared up, and these characters are paired up into convenient relationships. However, the other relationship that forms throughout the play is made up by two lower class characters that have a stronger bond. Shakespeare uses these relationships to imply that people of higher class tend to marry people based on their social rank, looks, or convenience, rather than on inner emotions, because they feel all noble people should be married to someone that is ideally of equal social rank. Orsino is the Duke of Illyria, meaning he is a very highly ranked person in his area. Because he is so high up, he expects to end up with someone also high up or noble. In the beginning of the play he explains his love for the countess, Olivia, “Why, so do I, the noblest that I have. O when mine eyes did see Olivia first, Methought she purges the air of pestilence. That instant was I turned into a hart, And my desires, like fell cruel hounds, E’er since pursue me”
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twelfth night - Jessica Shelby Professor Watts IAH 207 sec...

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