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Material and Non - the Yanomamo society in the Amazon who...

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Material and Non Material Culture Sociologists describe two interrelated aspects of human culture: the physical objects of  the culture and the ideas associated with these objects. Material culture  refers to the physical objects, resources, and spaces that people use  to define their culture. These include homes, neighborhoods, cities, schools, churches,  synagogues, temples, mosques, offices, factories and plants, tools, means of  production, goods and products, stores, and so forth. All of these physical aspects of a  culture help to define its members' behaviors and perceptions. For example, technology  is a vital aspect of material culture in today's United States. American students must  learn to use computers to survive in college and business, in contrast to young adults in 
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Unformatted text preview: the Yanomamo society in the Amazon who must learn to build weapons and hunt. Non-material culture refers to the nonphysical ideas that people have about their culture, including beliefs, values, rules, norms, morals, language, organizations, and institutions. For instance, the non-material cultural concept of religion consists of a set of ideas and beliefs about God, worship, morals, and ethics. These beliefs, then, determine how the culture responds to its religious topics, issues, and events. When considering non-material culture, sociologists refer to several processes that a culture uses to shape its members' thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Four of the most important of these are symbols, language, values, and norms....
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