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Universal Education

Universal Education - states This fragmented political...

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Universal Education: Growth and Function Education  generally refers to a social institution responsible for providing knowledge,  skills, values, and norms.  Universal education in the United States grew out of the political and economic needs of  a diverse and fledgling nation. Immigrants came from many cultures and religious  beliefs; consequently, no common national culture existed. Without a cohesive structure  to pass on the democratic values that had brought the country's independence, the new  nation risked fragmentation. Founding Father Thomas Jefferson and dictionary-compiler Noah Webster recognized  in the 1800s that democracy depended upon a well-educated, voting populace able to  reason and engage in public debate. The nation did not fully realize their vision of  education immediately. Many states saw “the nation” as a conglomeration of nation 
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Unformatted text preview: states. This fragmented political atmosphere created an education system with no system at all: Each locality administered its own system with no connection to any other locality. To complicate matters, public schools at that time required tuition, making them inaccessible to the poor, unless the poor were fortunate enough to attend for free. Many religious groups opened parochial schools, but, again, only the rich could afford to attend. Only the wealthiest could afford high school and college. Furthermore, while the political structure may have required an educated voter, the economic structure, which was still based on agriculture, did not require an educated worker....
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