The man sees the boy as something that is greater than himself

The man sees the boy as something that is greater than himself

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Unformatted text preview: The man sees the boy as something that is greater than himself, something holy, as is symbolized by the man referring to his son as the "golden chalice." He also describes the moment in which he washes the bad man's brains from his sons hair as some kind of "ancient anointing," something that indicates the boy's holiness in this new world. Because the man was chosen as the boy's father, he has been entrusted by God to take care of him. The man reflects often on his role as the father, how he must be the one to wash the bad man's brains from his son's hair, and he questions again in this chapter about whether he'll be able to kill his son if the time should come. With one bullet left, he knows that Fire continues to be a central theme, as many of the descriptions in this section focus on the building of fires, how the man shapes the fire, and how both he and his son stoke the fire. In many ways, the of fires, how the man shapes the fire, and how both he and his son stoke the fire....
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