This chapter introduces two more important characters in the novel

This chapter introduces two more important characters in the novel

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Unformatted text preview: This chapter introduces two more important characters in the novel, Olmsted and Prendergast. Olmsted's character further develops a theme already introduced in previous chapters: pride. Chicago's pride ultimately makes the city and its people dream big enough to win the bid for the fair under the premise of outdoing the recent Paris fair. In Olmsted is a man driven not by money or prestige but by something different: pride in his work. Ironically, Ellsworth's appeal to Olmsted's pride in his country isn't what gets him on board as landscape architect for the fair; Olmsted's pride in his profession prompts him to make a commitment in the fair. In revealing the global economic decline of the time, the author creates a sense of urgency and suspense. Will the economy allow for the building of a fair grander than the Paris exposition? If so, will the fair draw a crowd that surpasses the numbers that Paris exposition?...
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