business framework - Understanding Systems From a Business...

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Unformatted text preview: Understanding Systems From a Business Viewpoint 2 Opening Case - Amazon At the beginning: Large discounts Focus on customers online shopping experience: easy search, varied information about books, customer profiles, etc. Very little inventory 3 An evolving business model: Large warehouses Branched into selling other types of products Service perceived as very reliable Not profitable! 4 The Need for Frameworks and Models Framework = a brief set of ideas & assumptions for thinking about a particular issue Model = a useful representation of some aspect of reality Typically based on a frameworks Emphasize some features of reality, while ignoring others The Work System Framework 6 Figure 1.1 7 The system actually performing the work Business process Participants Information Technology Outputs: Products & services used by the customers External factors Infrastructure Context 8 The business process is at the core of the work system The same process can be performed with drastically different results depending on Who does the work What information & technology is being used 9 Balance Between the Elements of a Work System The work system elements must be in balance A change in one element usually requires a change in other elements Well-intended changes may also have negative impacts 10 Viewing Information Systems and Projects As Work Systems Information system Information system = a work system devoted to capturing, transmitting, storing, retrieving, manipulating, and displaying information Software products are NOT information systems Project Project = a work system that is designed to produce a particular product and then go out of existence 11 Work System Principles Figure 2.3 12 Relationships Between Work Systems and Information Systems Figure 2.4 13 Need for a Balanced View of a System Figure 2.5 14 Each of the three viewpoints is essential, but an excessive emphasis on any of them may lead to problems The importance of the ongoing collaboration between business and IT professionals The Principle-based Systems Analysis Method One of the possible ways to analyze a work system 16...
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course MARKETING Strategic taught by Professor Martin during the Spring '11 term at University of Liverpool.

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business framework - Understanding Systems From a Business...

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