Fossil Hominid3 - Fossil Hominids: mitochondrial DNA In...

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Fossil Hominids: mitochondrial DNA In July 1997, the first successful extraction of Neandertal DNA was announced. In an article in the journal Cell , a team of German and American researchers led by Svante Pääbo (Krings et al. 1997) claimed to have extracted mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from a piece of bone cut from the upper arm of the first recognised Neandertal fossil, the individual found at the Feldhofer grotto in the Neander Valley in Germany in 1856 (Kahn and Gibbons 1997, Ward and Stringer 1997). What is the significance of this study? What is mitochondrial DNA? DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is the gigantic molecule which is used to encode genetic information for all life on Earth. DNA molecules consists of a long strand of base molecules arranged in the form of a double helix. The bases are adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine, often abbreviated as A, G, C, and T. What we ordinarily think of as "our" DNA, because it controls most aspects of our physical appearance, is also known as "nuclear DNA", because every cell in our bodies
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course GLY GLY1100 taught by Professor Jaymuza during the Spring '10 term at Broward College.

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Fossil Hominid3 - Fossil Hominids: mitochondrial DNA In...

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