Significance of an Earlier Emergence of Homo sapiens

Significance of an Earlier Emergence of Homo sapiens -...

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Significance of an Earlier Emergence of Homo sapiens Ethiopia's Omo River flows below bluffs of the Kibish rock formation, where scientists first excavated the bones of early humans in 1967 and estimated they were 130,000 years old. But in a new study in the journal Nature, scientists from Utah, New York state and Australia determined those bones and newly excavated fossils actually were from a member of our species who roamed the area 195,000 years ago. They are the oldest known fossils of Homo sapiens. Credit: Frank Brown, University of Utah Full size image available here Brown says that pushing the emergence of Homo sapiens from about 160,000 years ago back to about 195,000 years ago "is significant because the cultural aspects of humanity in most cases appear much later in the record – only 50,000 years ago – which would mean 150,000 years of Homo sapiens without cultural stuff, such as evidence of eating fish, of harpoons, anything to do with music (flutes and that sort of thing), needles, even tools. This stuff all comes in very late,
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Significance of an Earlier Emergence of Homo sapiens -...

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