Ecological Conditions Favoring Delayed Reciprocit1

Ecological Conditions Favoring Delayed Reciprocit1 -...

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Ecological Conditions Favoring Delayed Reciprocity So what does any of this have to do with reciprocity? According to ecological theory, quite a lot: given diminishing fitness returns to food consumption (i.e., a downwards-bending curve), risk (variation in outcome) can make reciprocity very adaptive To see why, consider a simple little scenario, involving a population of two individuals (I said "simple"!) who survive through foraging or farming Each person's food income is likely to fluctuate from day to day or year to year, due to chance events (in weather, animal behavior, injuries that might prevent you from working on some days, etc.), and we might suppose this could be unpleasant (you might go hungry some days) or even disastrous (you might starve, or succumb to disease in your weakened state) But suppose this variation is not synchronized (e.g., each individual forages or farms in different but nearby areas, each has an independent chance of getting injured, etc.)
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Ecological Conditions Favoring Delayed Reciprocit1 -...

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