Ecological Models of Competitio1

Ecological Models of Competitio1 - Ecological Models of...

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Unformatted text preview: Ecological Models of Competition Hawk-Dove model is useful for illustrating some fundamental points about how selection might favor strategic forms of conflict, but it doesn't say much about the ecological determinants of costs and benefits that shape resource contests in the real world (factors that will shape which resources are worth fighting over, the payoffs of winning, etc.) One way ecologists have got into the act is by analyzing the population ecology of resource competition Formal definition of competition: Active demand by 2 or more individuals or groups for a resource that is actually or potentially limiting By limiting , we mean any increase in the per-capita amount of the resource leads to an increase in the population (or an increase in the reproductive success of individuals who gain access to the resource) A more direct measure of competition between two groups (could be subgroups within a single population, or could be populations of two different species) is that an increase in...
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course ANT ANT2000 taught by Professor Monicaoyola during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Ecological Models of Competitio1 - Ecological Models of...

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